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19 December 2018 - SIS Gender Pay Gap Report 2018

Diversity and inclusion are mission critical to SIS. Diverse teams drive creativity, improve decision making and ensure we reflect the country we serve, making the most of the UK’s talent.  It is vital that we create a workplace where all staff can fulfil their potential and contribute to making the UK safe and prosperous.

Background

In early 2017 the Government announced legislation making it statutory for organisations with 250 or more employees to report annually their gender pay gap. We believe it is important to be open about our progress, as equality is essential to us, and our plans.

The Gender Pay Gap shows the difference in the average pay between all men and women in a workforce. If a workforce has a particularly high gender pay gap, this can indicate there may be a number of issues to deal with, and the individual calculations may help to identify what those issues are. The gender pay gap is different to equal pay.

Equal Pay deals with the pay differences between men and women who carry out the same jobs, similar jobs or work of equal value. It is unlawful to pay people unequally because they are a man or a woman.

SIS promotes the fair treatment of all employees in its pay and reward.

Data

As at 31 March 2018, the SIS headcount is made up of 36% Women and 64% Men.

 

Ordinary Pay

The mean [1] gender pay gap is the difference between mean pay for female and male employees. In SIS the mean pay for men is 8.8% higher than for women.

The median gender pay gap is the difference between median “ordinary pay” for female and male employees. In SIS the median pay for men is 7.7% higher than for women.

Bonuses

The mean gender pay gap for bonuses is the difference between mean bonuses paid to female and male employees. In SIS the mean gender pay gap for bonuses for men is 15.4% higher than for women.

The median gender pay gap for bonuses is the difference between the median bonuses paid to female and male employees. In SIS the median gender pay gap for bonuses for men is 16.7% higher than for women.

The proportion of employees paid a bonus is 52.0% of men and 58.2% of women.  In line with the legislation we have included all payments including small recognition payments that are paid throughout the year to recognise specific achievements.

Proportion of Men and Women in each Pay Quartile

The figure below highlights the higher number of women in the lowest quartile (53%) compared to the highest quartile (26%).

[1] Mean is the sum of all pay divided by the number of people; the median is the middle ranked pay where you line all salaries up in ascending order.

Next Steps

Our analysis shows that the main driver behind the pay gap is a greater proportion of men in more senior grades. As a result, the mean and median pay is lower for women. Bonus amounts also increase with grade and this explains why, on average, bonus amounts are higher for men.

One of the key strands of our Diversity and Inclusion Strategy and Plan is to diversify the talent pipeline, aiming ultimately at gender parity at all grades. SIS is a meritocracy and the Board has set targets and approved positive action measures designed to improve the representation of women in senior roles.

Diversity and inclusion is also a central focus in our recruitment processes where we are putting particular effort into our outreach work and attraction strategies.

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[1] Mean is the sum of all pay divided by the number of people; the median is the middle ranked pay where you line all salaries up in ascending order.